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Latest revision as of 07:31, 26 October 2019

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Message definition (Development/Tutorials/Saving and loading)
Now that we have our <tt>QByteArray</tt>, we use it to write to the file with <tt>QSaveFile::write()</tt>. If we were using a normal <tt>QFile</tt>, this would make the changes immediately. However, if a problem occurred partway through writing, the file would become corrupted. For this reason, <tt>QSaveFile</tt> works by first writing to a temporary file and then, when you call <tt>QSaveFile::commit()</tt> the changes are made to the actual file. <tt>commit()</tt> also closes the file.
TranslationNow that we have our <tt>QByteArray</tt>, we use it to write to the file with <tt>QSaveFile::write()</tt>. If we were using a normal <tt>QFile</tt>, this would make the changes immediately. However, if a problem occurred partway through writing, the file would become corrupted. For this reason, <tt>QSaveFile</tt> works by first writing to a temporary file and then, when you call <tt>QSaveFile::commit()</tt> the changes are made to the actual file. <tt>commit()</tt> also closes the file.

Now that we have our QByteArray, we use it to write to the file with QSaveFile::write(). If we were using a normal QFile, this would make the changes immediately. However, if a problem occurred partway through writing, the file would become corrupted. For this reason, QSaveFile works by first writing to a temporary file and then, when you call QSaveFile::commit() the changes are made to the actual file. commit() also closes the file.


This page was last edited on 26 October 2019, at 07:31. Content is available under Creative Commons License SA 4.0 unless otherwise noted.