Documentation Primer/Manual/DocBook Reference/Lists

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Lists

<listitem>

<listitem> is the main building block of almost all the lists. It should always contain some other markup, usually a <para>

<orderedlist>

Use this type of list when the order of the items matters, but they are not a set of steps that are carried out to achieve something. A good example is a list of things in order of importance.

<itemizedlist>

Use an itemized list when the order of the items is not important.

<variablelist>

A list that has two sections for each entry. Examples: A menu item, and what the menu item does, An action, and its result, or a term and its definition. This is a very common type of list. (Almost this entire document is composed of variable lists.)
<variablelist> contains the following elements:
<varlistentry>
A <varlistentry> is a wrapper around each pair in the variable list.
<term>
To reuse the above examples, the <term> for each pair would be the menu item you are describing, the action, or the term you are defining. You can use the id attribute for this element, which is quite convenient in long lists such as a menu reference, enabling you to link directly to a particular menu item from another part of the document.
<listitem>
As described above the <listitem> is used inside a <varlistentry> to hold the second part of the pair: The result of choosing that menu item, for example, the consequences of an action, or the definition of the term.

<procedure>

Use a procedure list when you are listing a sequence of steps which are performed in a particular order.
A procedure contains only one tag:
<step>
A step is one of the sequence of events that make up a procedure.
<substeps>
A step can contain substeps

<simplelist>

A simple list is just that - a simple list, with no formatting required. A simple list can contain only one type of element:
<member>
Members of a simple list.

<segmentedlist>

A Segmented list is a very particular type of list. Use sparingly, as it's very difficult to get these right, and most content appropriate for a segmented list could just as well fit the table model.
Example: A Segmented List
<segmentedlist>
<segtitle>Name</segtitle>
<segtitle>Occupation</segtitle>
<segtitle>Favorite Food</segtitle>
<seglistitem>
<seg>Tux</seg>
<seg>Linux Mascot</seg>
<seg>Herring</seg>
</seglistitem>
<seglistitem>
<seg>Konqui</seg>
<seg>The KDE Dragon</seg>
<seg>Gnomes</seg>
</seglistitem>
</segmentedlist>


Name: Tux
Occupation: Linux Mascot
Favorite Food: Herring
Name: Konqui
Occupation: The KDE Dragon
Favorite Food: Gnomes
The segmented list contains the following elements:
<segtitle>
The title each segment will have
<seglistitem>
A set of entries in the list
<seg>
The contents of the entries in the list. In each <seglistitem> there is one <seg> for each <segtitle>.

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